Best Conferences for Entrepreneurs under 30

 visionary 
MakingTheShift Foundation

If you’re an entrepreneur under 30 years old and you’ve attended a few business conferences, you may have found them geared toward a different generation. Even if you’ve attended a conference that targets young entrepreneurs, perhaps it was run by a different age group and therefore came across as less than authentic.
Below are seven conferences that deliver the goods for young entrepreneurs, many of them managed entirely by young entrepreneurs.
1. HustleCon

HustleCon began in 2013 and is managed by Sam Parr, who is 25 years old. The crowd includes techies, but is geared toward non-techie founders. It follows a TED-event format, but is less uptight and more fast and loose, like a startup. Attendees learn how to start and run a business with practical advice from successful entrepreneurs such as Tim Westergren of Pandora, Arum Kang from Coffee Meets Bagel and Matthew Brimer from General Assembly.

2. HOBY

Geared toward high school students, HOBY attendees are between 15 to 16 years old and get to experience three to four days of community building and leadership training, meet leaders from their regions and provide service. This event is geared less towards the business sense of the term entrepreneur and more to future leaders looking to create opportunities and solve problems.
3. Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization (CEO) National Conference.

This event celebrates student entrepreneurship and teaches what isn’t heard much from Silicon Valley, which is that it’s OK to stay in school and still run your business. Scores of entrepreneurs share their stories about how they founded and grew their businesses and what they learned in the process.
4. TEDxTeen

TEDxTeen gets straight to the need for inspiration, and puts young people in a place to get juiced up about changing and impacting the world.

5. Nexus Global Youth

Nexus Global Youth boasts an international dynamic with more than 2,000 young people from 70 countries focused on philanthropy and impact investing. Nexus breaks those barriers for young entrepreneurs who may have felt isolated from professional networks in their regions. If social entrepreneurship is your thing, this is an event you’ll want to attend.
6. Thiel Summit

Founded by billionaire Paypal founder Peter Thiel and geared for those 25 years old or younger, the Thiel Summit brings together the brightest minds in technology and social entrepreneurship for community building. Speakers are attendees themselves, and the event crowdsources panel ideas. Attendees walk away as friends and the benefits of attendance continue after the conference is over through a private Facebook group and meetups.
7. Next Gen Summit

Next Gen Summit is managed by 19-year-old Justin Lafazan. At the 2015 conference, startups raised close to $1,000,000 from investors. The Next Gen Summit provides young entrepreneurs with resources they need to be successful, such as social capital, education, inspiration and investment. The oldest speakers are 25 years old.

8. Entrepreneur Nigth – Power Team International.

Don’t miss one of the Best Entrepreneur Events Helping Entrepreneurs & Small Business Owners everywhere achieve over the top outstanding results! And there is no cost (regular price $97 includes your FREE Gift) when you register with this link: www.success2020.com/mastermind2020

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10 Ways to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking

Public Speaking

The most common phobia that people have is the “fear of public speaking”. Some people dread it more than death. Schools and colleges rarely provide training on public speaking; you’re just told to stand at the front and read your book report or story of what you did that summer. Being judged by your peers can make you either love or hate the attention you get from speaking to an audience.

Having confidence with public speaking will make you stand out from the crowd. You’ll be more likely to succeed at job interviews. You’ll be more comfortable contributing your point of view when working in a team. And you’ll be more likely to give winning presentations and seminars in the workplace. Altogether you’ll have a better professional life and relationships with your colleagues.

As a confident speaker you’ll be more comfortable breaking the ice and starting conversations with strangers. You’ll be a better networker with an expanded social circle and self-confidence in your personal life.

Plus you’ll be more likely to succeed in a career where teaching or training is required, whether you’re teaching to an individual or from stage to an audience of two thousand people.

With all these opportunities for succees, the key is about overcoming your fear of public speaking. The first tip? Remember that you’re not alone and that almost everyone has a fear of public speaking!

1. Have Powerful Physiology.

If you act “as if you’re the boss” often you get to be boss is an old principle in business. And now one of the most prestigious business schools in the world, Harvard, has proved the idea.

Organisational psychologist Professor Amy Cuddy has shown that when people change their postures into dominant poses their testosterone goes up and their cortisol goes down. Those changes are associated with leadership roles, and people do feel more powerful when they adopt the appropriate body language.

Walk on stage with confidence, with your shoulders back and arms powerful. Don’t allow yourself to be stiff; just be real and strong.

2. Breathe.

Healthy, deep breathing improves your ability to be effective whenever you are facing a particularly stressful situation. So it’s natural that you’d need it before delivering presentations, or when you’re about to deliver bad news, or when you need to ask for something important.

Deep breathing helps relieve nervous energy. It helps develop a strong voice and it helps to strengthen personal intensity. It is important for our energy, our focus, and our concentration.

Unfortunately, most of us breathe with our shoulders. We’re shallow “chest breathers” where our stomach goes in and shoulders go up. But if you fill your lungs with a deep inhale and follow it up with a slow exhale, it will relax and refresh you.

3. Come from service (it’s not about you).

Start out by taking the pressure off of you and your performance. No matter who you’re speaking to, your focus needs to be in one place only — on your audience. It’s not about you. It’s all about them.

Audience-centered speaking will help to move your audience to action. You need to listen to your audience from the moment you step in front of people. And when you ask ‘How are you?’ of an audience, wait to see how some members of that audience actually are. Don’t continue until you’ve learned the answer, either verbally or nonverbally.

Take a good look around the room, smile while you make some eye contact, take a few steps toward the group and let your hands fall open gracefully toward the audience — as though you wished you could give them a big hug. (or not, but hopefully you get the idea!)

4. Don’t take anything personally.

As long as your information is correct, nobody is going to hold anything against your if you make a mistake. Follow the examples of great comedians. Instead of letting mistakes interrupt the show, they incorporate them into the show. They laugh at themselves. This gets the audience to laugh with them instead of at them.

With a public presentation, you want the audience to laugh with you when something goes wrong instead of laughing at you. You can achieve this by not taking mistakes personally and having a sense of humor about them.

5. Stay present.

A public speaking event often involves a ton of distractions for the speaker. Unfortunately these distractions draw us away from what’s happening in the present moment. So it’s important that you anchor yourself: to yourself, to your audience, to your content, and to your context.

Focusing on your breath is one tactic you can use to feel centered within ourselves and your presentation. To stay present with your audience just remember that the audience is filled with people – with individual human beings just like you and me – and by connecting with them one at a time. And, finally, to stay present your message, remember what is it that you want to accomplish. Why have you been asked to speak in the first place? What do you feel passionately about that brings us to this presentation? What is the gift that you are sharing with your audience? What is your core message? When we focus on these questions rather than our fear, we are able to stay grounded in what’s truly important to us.

6. Say to your mindfrick, “Thank you for sharing”.

No matter what, there’s going to be a little voice in your head saying something to you. More likely than not that mindfrick is going to be chattering away telling you that you can’t do it. But remember that you’re stronger than you think.

When that little voice starts going on and attacking your confidence, just say to yourself “Thank you for sharing” and move on. Don’t respond. Don’t listen. Don’t dwell. Don’t work yourself up into a tizzy. Instead acknowledge that it’s just your mind trying to get the best of you, and move on.

7. Remember, you don’t look as nervous as you feel.

Remember what “fear” is. Fear is the anticipation of pain. Is your fear real or imagined? Chances are likely that it’s imagined. Your fear is not that you don’t know your topic. It is that you don’t know what will happen when you step to the podium.

When you’re walking out on stage, no one knows you’re nervous. Your stomach could be in knots and you may feel like you’re going to be sick, but you aren’t showing it. There are only a few subtle cues that show a person is nervous and they’re so small that the ordinary person wouldn’t be able to notice them from where they’re sitting. People don’t see that nervous beast inside you!

8. It gets easier.

Really and truly, it does get easier. Get practice and feedback in a safe environment by joining a public speaking group like mastermind2020 Toastmasters club. You’ll get the chance to learn from watching others. And you’ll be reminded that you’re not alone with your fear. Something that helps more than anything is practicing the outline of what you want to say. The more you know your content, the less nervous you’re likely to feel. Speaking groups are an excellent way to hone your presentation’s content and structure.

9. People want you to succeed.

Audiences want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you. So give them what they want and feel great in the process!

10. Trust yourself.

As long as you know where your content is starting, and where you want to go, trust that you’ll be able to take your audience from Point A to Point B. Know where you’re going by picking a few main points and bring them to life with stories. If you practice enough, you’ll soon come across smooth. And know that you CAN do it.

To your success,

Andres

The Brain of the Successful Businessman

Real entrepreneurs love their businesses, are good at what they do, and provide 90% of the employment in the world. They are the engine that drives capitalist societies.  This is something you may want to consider if you are an entrepreneur.

Men and Women who succeed in business of any kind – those producers who take personal responsibility for their income and not via a job – share a particular attitude and mindset that works. Those who don’t, simply fail. And while not all failures can be attributed to the fault of the entrepreneur – acts of God, and so on, it mostly is our fault.

The transition from employee to entrepreneur is difficult for most, while for the real entrepreneur it’s a wonderful liberation. Of course background and conditioning have an effect, but the most important factor is attitude. In the final analysis, the defining factor is mindset. Please note that when I talk about “entrepreneurs,” I’m not talking about franchisees – employees who buy an expensive job and continue to take orders and demand that the franchisor take ultimate responsibility for the franchisee’s success or failure.

I’m talking about lasting success, not a lucky break, a flash in the pan, being at the right place at the right time, or buying a business that is already so successful that it’s hard to fail; I refer to the self made person who builds lasting success and bounces back from failures.

So, what is the ideal mindset for progress and production in business?

Successful business owners, be they network marketers, Donald Trumps, shoe polishers, auto shops, roofing business owners, plumbers, or authors, are driven people. Their goals and objectives drive them through the tough times. And they tend to surround themselves with like minded people – winners, not whiners. They read, they are lifetime learners, and they are humble. Most of all, they are self disciplined. A successful entrepreneur is seldom obese, a smoker, a drinker, late for meetings, or badly dressed. And they are well groomed, because they have a healthy self respect. Donald Trump doesn’t drink, smoke, or use bad language. I certainly can’t imagine him smoking pot.

Authenticity, integrity and decency are hallmarks of these winners – they are not politically correct hypocrites or passive aggressive back stabbers; you know where you stand with them.

You learn more at www.MasterMind2020.com

Being a great accountability partner

The Process for being a great Accountability Partner

  • Some qualities of a good accountability partner are: they have an important goal too, they are trustworthy to show up each time, they care about your success, they want accountability also
  • Each person explains exactly what they want to be held accountable for
  • It’s not a casual conversation, it’s a strategic meeting
  • Set a specific length of time for the meeting
  • Set a recurring day, recurring time, for the weekly calls
  • Set an agenda that you will follow each time
  • Set a specific number of meetings you’ll have in the series. Then decide to go for another period of time or change partners
  • Put into writing how both parties will benefit by being an accountability partner
  • Be sure they know your vision and the cost to you of failure to follow through
  • Do your personalities match, will this be a good fit?

To your Success,

Andres Hurtado Rangel
http://www.mastermind2020.com

Something about Passive Income

Earnings an individual derives from a rental property, limited partnership or other enterprise in which he or she is not actively involved. As with non-passive income, passive income is usually taxable; however it is often treated differently by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS ‘PASSIVE INCOME’
There are three main categories of income: active income, passive income and portfolio income. Passive income does not include earnings from wages or active business participation, nor does it include income from dividends, interest or capital gains. For tax purposes, it is important to note that losses in passive income generally cannot offset active or portfolio income.

It is important to note that, by some, portfolio income is considered passive income; in which case dividends and interest would be considered passive. The important definition is the one the IRS uses, and to be sure your taxes are filed correctly, it would be prudent to check with the IRS or a tax professional on this matter if you have a blend of active, passive, and portfolio income.

See more about How to generate massive passive income with private lending http://www.AHRcapital.com

Learn to Invest

To Learn more about Private Lending and use this as a great vehicle for Passive Income go to AHR Capital Group http://www.AHRcapital.com

Average vs Winners

Average people seek out people who are in more trouble and who are more desperate than they are. They need to surround themselves with losers so that they can feel good about themselves. They stand up for the underdog and the environment because that’s the only way they can feel important. They have “Ain’t it awful?” conversations and blame others for their own lack of success.
Winners seek out those who are more successful and positive than they are. They take responsibility for their own results and will not associate with losers and leeches. They feel they deserve what they earn.
 
Average people need instant results to keep them motivated. They have no staying power. They think business is like instant coffee and they hate the idea of work. They will only try new ventures for a few weeks before quitting and blaming the opportunity and shooting the messenger.
Winners understand compound growth and the slight edge. They are willing to put in the time and effort in order to see exponential growth down the line. They understand sowing and reaping and work with the natural laws of the universe.
 
Average people are mystics and believe in luck and chance. Along with their cigarettes and beer they buy lottery tickets. They gamble and wish.
Winners believe in responsibility and choice. They create their own success. They are objective, rational and careful where they invest their resources. I’ve never met a winner who gambles, or buys lottery tickets. And it’s rare to find winners who smoke.
 
Average people read newspapers, watch CNN, and spend hours watching sport. Their input is meaningless and negative. They live vicariously through soap operas and sports.
Winners carefully monitor their INPUT, participate in meaningful activities, and respect their own time as their greatest resource. They don’t not allow negative input in their lives.

 

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