4 ways to ScaleUp your Business From Startup mode.

As your organization becomes a more complex organism, you’ll find that your team can no longer fit at one table. At this point, you need to play a more sophisticated game. If team members are chaotically chasing each business challenge, or even worse, you, the CEO, are kicking the ball into the goal and making every decision, you’re still playing toddler game. This is bad for your team, and your business will suffer.

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As CEO, it’s your job to get off the field and start coaching your team on how to play a less chaotic version of the game: any team sport, when played well is a beautiful metaphor for building a functional team and scaling your business.

1. Start defining the function of roles.

Your early-stage team was likely comprised of people who like to do “a little bit of everything,” which means they probably won’t enjoy giving up responsibilities. But if you don’t start asking employees to narrow their focus, scaling will become pretty much impossible. Whether it’s turning your “marketing person” into an entire team with specialized roles, or restructuring your organization so employees can divvy up responsibilities in a more effective way, functionalist roles can be a painful process. You might even have a few employees leave because of the changes you make.

But this is a crucial part of building a big, well-oiled scale-up. And keep in mind, this doesn’t mean that employees can’t be creative or take on big, ambitious projects. You should still encourage big risks and creativity — just make sure they keep spending a majority of time on functional priorities.

2. Find amazing coaches to guide your team.

Hiring good managers is one the best things you do for your business as you scale. I know many founders and startup employees think  “management” is a bad word, but look at it this way: managers are the people who take care of the dirty work — metrics, quotas, reports, systems, processes — and empower your team to take on the big, interesting challenges. With effective managers in place, your engineers, marketers, and other employees can spend more time doing cool stuff, and less time worried about all the little things that have to get done to keep your business running.

After hitting around 25 employees, I suggest moving toward an 80/20 workforce: 80 percent DO-ers and 20 percent coaches. You probably won’t have a tough time finding great doers (hopefully you’ve already hired a lot of them), but finding great coaches can be a challenge. At minimum, great coaches need to lead, inspire and be above the minor quibbles and BS that can happen as your company grows.

3. Prepare your new players for success.

You can’t expect people to “hit the ground running” and just “get it done” if you don’t have a clear on-boarding process. Most startups neglect on-boarding for far too long, but all eventually hit a point where new employees don’t just “get it.” The time has come to make a concerted effort to set your new hires up for success.

You should invest a few days (or even a full week) getting people acquainted with all the different aspects of your business. At BiZion Group, we give people a crash course in entrepreneurship, because this is what we teach.At SynerMedia, we give people a crash course in Marketing, because this is what we Do. Everyone on your team should, at minimum, understand what your business is doing, who you’re up against and why you think you’ll win. Every single person on your team should be able to give an effective elevator pitch.

4. Take care of your team, both on and off the field.

Do you have systems in place to support the health and well-being of your employees? I’m talking a 401(k), “SelfDirect” generous paternity and maternity leave and other perks that companies should provide once they’ve left scrappy startup territory. Making this a priority will keep morale high, encourage vital employees to stick with you and make it easier to bring in critical, high-level hires in the future. It’s just the right thing to do.

This is a general overview of some of the things to keep in mind as you transition into scale-up mode, but there are tons of other tough issues that will pop up as you grow: Do you need a CFO? How should you set up your team? What are the appropriate compensation plans for the sales team, engineering team, etc.? When should you get involved in what’s happening across the company? Seek support from other entrepreneurs and your advisors to help answer the big questions that pop up.

Going from a startup to a scale-up means big and sometimes uncomfortable changes, but these growing pains are all part of the fun of taking your business to the next level. Start by Outsourcing a team and learn how to scale up work with a outsourcing team.

Good luck!

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Invitación a una Nueva Comunidad de Profesionales

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Si bien es cierto que este tipo de comunidades son, relativamente nuevas, también es verdad que nuestra nueva comunidad de profesionales, es de ingenieros y administradores de Tecnología, será una excelente “plataforma de lanzamiento” para usted, que es un innovador y emprendedor de Cloud.

Usted podrá contar con las ya imprescindibles condiciones de un modelo, a manera de mixtura, que combina lo tradicional, con un DataCenter alterno de proveedores y con nubes privadas, entre otros aspectos. Todo ello, para potencializar, al máximo, las cargas de trabajo que jalonan su empresa/negocio hacia un alto nivel de competitividad, lo que se traduce en un mayor rendimiento económico.

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“Juntos somos más”, como bien se ha dicho, tradicionalmente, ¿verdad? Entonces, únase a nosotros para que, además de disponer de todo lo que hemos aludido, pueda estar actualizado en las soluciones y servicios en la Nube Empresarial.

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Permítale a su empresa y, de paso, a usted mismo y sus empleados, conectarse con una comunidad que les brindará la posibilidad exclusiva de conocer a otros profesionales y empresas de la industria, para que, también, ustedes adquieran reconocimiento en la misma, como expertos.

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Los Nuevos Miembros Reciben un VOUCHER de $50 para registro de los seminarios.

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The 30 Daily Habits of a CEO Responsible for Success

Getting to the top involves doing the right things, day after day.  
Any CEO running a profitable company has figured a few things out. One of many habits to have in common is consistency. 

Here is my 30 habits 

1. Try one new thing each day.
“Every day, I force myself to do something that is out of my comfort zone.

2. Don’t do bad days. Running a company is really hard, and every day is different, but having a bad day is a choice.”

3. Stay informed about what’s trending.

“I spend an hour or two every day keeping up with tech news on Twitter. It’s not good to obsess over what other people are doing, but staying informed is certainly important.”

4. Accept invitations to as many meetings and events as possible.

“You never know who you will meet or the advice you’ll receive.”

5. Experiment constantly.

“I’m always trying new things and changing how I work. As we’ve grown from a small team to a bigger team, my businesses has changed pretty significantly, and by experimenting with new habits and processes regularly, I am always discovering better ways to run my team that make sense as we grow.”

6. Fight brain blocks with building blocks.

“There are footballs, golf balls, softballs, chessboards, Legos–everything a curious kid could dream of–covering our office space. Whenever I’m stuck on an idea, I play a quick game of catch or build a Lego house to give my brain a breather. Then it’s back to the drawing board. I encourage my team to do the same thing, too. Just like any muscle, your brain needs a recovery session after a tough workout.”

7. Never be afraid to email someone who is “too big.”

“Most people are accommodating and open, as long as you are clear about your needs and what you have to offer.”

8. Make punctuality a priority.

“I strive to be on time for every appointment, every day, without exception. This may seem like a no-brainer in the business world, but you would be surprised how many people still don’t make this a priority. It’s mind-boggling. If a leader is consistently late, it tells others that he or she is unreliable or has no respect for the time of the individuals he or she works with. If he or she is on time, the opposite is true.”

9. Never ask somebody to do something you wouldn’t do yourself.

“No matter how exciting your company or the problems that you are solving are, there will always be day-to-day tasks that are simply boring. Showing that you are willing to roll up your sleeves when the going gets tough will be a positive example for your team. You will be amazed at how this reverberates.”

10. Watch YouTube to learn from other great leaders.
“I spend time at the end of every night watching interviews, speeches, and panels of other leaders I admire. Through a bit of YouTube stalking, I’ve gotten great lessons on culture from Brian Chesky, brand building from Neil Blumenthal, and leadership from Esther Dyson.”

11. Exercise and meditate.

“Transcendental meditation for 20 minutes in the morning and 20 minutes in the evening is the perfect complement to daily exercise, whether it’s a trip to the gym or a run on the beach. Since I’ve started this routine, I’ve found my mental clarity and focus have increased enormously.”

12. Listen to self-improvement books in the car.

“I spend about 90 minutes running and 20mins driving to have a meeting each day. I can spend that time listening to music, but I choose to spend it listening to business books and self-improvement books. Over the last two and a half years, I have listened to nearly 45 audiobooks. These books have given me incredible insight into how to run my businesses and sharpen my skills. I can listen to a new book in a few days, versus reading a book, which would take me at least a month or two, if not longer, but always create the time.”

13. Start each day with an infectious positive attitude.

“I wake up and start every day with one initial thought: being thankful for the abundance in my life–family, friends, company, and more. Nothing good ever comes easy. Hard work and dedication always pays off. Starting every day with a strong, positive thought is the best way to kickoff each day. I believe that a positive mindset is key to overcoming all obstacles, and I radiate this to my team. Just as negativity is infectious–think: one rotten apple at the bottom of a barrel ultimately will ruin them all–so is positivity. Choose to be positive. Be mindful of your attitude and how it affects others.”

14. Make time for everyone on your team, no matter where they are.

“We are based in the U.S., but also have teams and customers on the ground in Asia, Central America, South America, and Europe. Connecting with them every day is incredibly important for staying connected to that part of the business, making sure they know they’re valued and getting things done. It’s a big time commitment, and sometimes it feels like we have multiple jobs–in the morning in Europe, during the day in the Americas, and at night when the Asia teams are busy. But in the end, it’s always worth it to be available and have live discussions when they matter the most.”

15. Make the most of drive time.

“I like to schedule some of my most important calls during my morning drive to the gym or to the beach. While it can be frustrating at times to have a long commute, not to mention often getting stuck in traffic, find this time very useful for scheduling calls that are uninterrupted. It also allows you to accomplish a lot more for the day when You get into the office, knowing these important conversations have already taken place and You can focus on other matters.”

16. Make every meeting the second meeting.

“Always have papers before a meeting, read them, and never just do a page-turn. That way, every meeting is really the second meeting.”

17. Find your inner yogi.

“Yoga has helped in so many areas of my life. It forces me to unplug from whatever issue I’m dealing with, spend time as a student, and focus on being present in the moment. I can walk into a studio anywhere in the world and get centered in no time. Early in my career, I would have rolled my eyes reading some executive profess how being on a yoga mat makes them good at business. But I have found a regular practice makes me a better leader, and keeps me sharp mentally and physically.”

18. Surround yourself with people whose skills complement your own.

“As a leader, it’s easy to feel like you need to know or do it all, but you will never be the best at everything. A mentor of mine once told me to focus on my strengths and team up with talented people for the rest. The old saying of ‘it takes a village’ is true in so many parts of life, and embracing it makes you a stronger, healthier person.”

19. Walk before bed.

“Every evening I take a 30-minute walk alone without music. It clears my head, calms me down from the daily activities of running multiple startups, and allows me to get proper perspective and clarity about priorities. Most importantly, I sleep like a baby. I learned the importance of this 15 years ago, after reading a biography of Harry Truman, who had to deal with being the president at the end of WWII.”

20. Make time in your life for fiction.

“It emboldens your imagination, gives your mind respite, and arms you with tactics on creating motivating, inspiring messaging. Don’t be afraid to take time out to free your mind from the strictures of reality.”

21. Focus on nutrition and appreciation.

“I have been having the same breakfast of a protein shake with healthy fats, a fresh pressed juice full of vegetables, and a fat burner for as long as I can remember. While I press the juice, I recite the three things I am most appreciative of that morning. Thinking on the things that are most important in my life helps me take down the kale and beet juice with a smile.”

22. Leave your work out of the bedroom.

“Your bedroom should be a sanctuary. Leave the TV, electronics, and work outside. By creating a work-free zone, you can reduce stress levels and, in turn, make the working time far more efficient…and most importantly, you will appreciate your partner, so does she.”

23. Use pictorial language to help people “see” the future.

“When describing the future, you can’t use facts and figures. You don’t have statistics to prove your points. You must largely rely on your imagination. And to convincingly bring your audience into the future, you must unlock their imaginations, helping them envision a different world. We all know, ‘a picture is worth a thousand words.’ So it shouldn’t be a surprise that images, and visual language such as metaphors and analogies, are of vital importance in bridging the gap between the cerebral and the imaginative.”
24. Exercise every day.

“I’ve exercised–whether it be lifting or running–religiously for the past 20 years of my life, and it has played a critical role in my daily attitude, work potential, and outlook on life.”

25. Don’t panic and don’t run.

“Teams look to their leaders to set the tone for how the business is operated. I ensure I establish and create a sense of urgency, while balancing it with control of key situations. I make time to speak with frustrated customers and meet with unhappy employees to stay close to the issues my team navigates on a daily basis. From these interchanges, I am able to learn more than I ever could learn from all the things that go according to plan.”

26. Use the 70/30 approach to professional life.

“Cultivate good judgment by learning to be comfortable making 100 percent of a decision with 70 percent of the data. This approach forces you to weigh what is really important and to understand the remainder of the data isn’t worth the time it takes to collect. Over time, you will make more good decisions and will accomplish more than the less confident and more risk averse. You will also be more competitive because you will accomplish more. Target being right 70 percent of the time with everything you do. Any extra time you spend on being right means you will miss opportunities, both personally and professionally.”

27. Make lists.

“In addition to making a list of the top three things I must get done each day, I make a list of the three things that must be achieved each month and each week to ensure the company is staying on track.”

28. encourage questions.

“Provide opportunity for at least one employee every day to ask you questions about whatever they have on their mind. It is very important to make employees feel like no question is out of limits. Q&A sessions with regular cadence make it easy for anyone in the organization to ask me questions. It is often these sessions that help me get the pulse of the company. It also becomes a forum for sharing ideas and discovering new ways of thinking or solving problems. But it’s extremely important that these opportunities to ask questions are presented in all sorts of settings–large groups, small groups, one-on-ones, and a mix of formal and casual settings.”

29. Talk to at least one customer every day.

“It’s by far the most efficient and productive way to gather feedback on [the company] and to understand the business more deeply. My company is nothing without its users, and the information I receive from customers is hugely influential on how we conduct business and shape our plans for the future.”

30. Start your day with a clean inbox.

“In order to start the day completely organized, I get up at 6 a.m. and get to inbox zero. Anything that can be answered with a short note or delegated to a team lead, I get out of the way immediately. Other items I prioritize for later sit down email blocks or meetings later in the day. This way, I can be truly focused during morning meetings.”

Learn more about MasterMind2020.com and Bizon Group 

Best Conferences for Entrepreneurs under 30

 visionary 
MakingTheShift Foundation

If you’re an entrepreneur under 30 years old and you’ve attended a few business conferences, you may have found them geared toward a different generation. Even if you’ve attended a conference that targets young entrepreneurs, perhaps it was run by a different age group and therefore came across as less than authentic.
Below are seven conferences that deliver the goods for young entrepreneurs, many of them managed entirely by young entrepreneurs.
1. HustleCon

HustleCon began in 2013 and is managed by Sam Parr, who is 25 years old. The crowd includes techies, but is geared toward non-techie founders. It follows a TED-event format, but is less uptight and more fast and loose, like a startup. Attendees learn how to start and run a business with practical advice from successful entrepreneurs such as Tim Westergren of Pandora, Arum Kang from Coffee Meets Bagel and Matthew Brimer from General Assembly.

2. HOBY

Geared toward high school students, HOBY attendees are between 15 to 16 years old and get to experience three to four days of community building and leadership training, meet leaders from their regions and provide service. This event is geared less towards the business sense of the term entrepreneur and more to future leaders looking to create opportunities and solve problems.
3. Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization (CEO) National Conference.

This event celebrates student entrepreneurship and teaches what isn’t heard much from Silicon Valley, which is that it’s OK to stay in school and still run your business. Scores of entrepreneurs share their stories about how they founded and grew their businesses and what they learned in the process.
4. TEDxTeen

TEDxTeen gets straight to the need for inspiration, and puts young people in a place to get juiced up about changing and impacting the world.

5. Nexus Global Youth

Nexus Global Youth boasts an international dynamic with more than 2,000 young people from 70 countries focused on philanthropy and impact investing. Nexus breaks those barriers for young entrepreneurs who may have felt isolated from professional networks in their regions. If social entrepreneurship is your thing, this is an event you’ll want to attend.
6. Thiel Summit

Founded by billionaire Paypal founder Peter Thiel and geared for those 25 years old or younger, the Thiel Summit brings together the brightest minds in technology and social entrepreneurship for community building. Speakers are attendees themselves, and the event crowdsources panel ideas. Attendees walk away as friends and the benefits of attendance continue after the conference is over through a private Facebook group and meetups.
7. Next Gen Summit

Next Gen Summit is managed by 19-year-old Justin Lafazan. At the 2015 conference, startups raised close to $1,000,000 from investors. The Next Gen Summit provides young entrepreneurs with resources they need to be successful, such as social capital, education, inspiration and investment. The oldest speakers are 25 years old.

8. Entrepreneur Nigth – Power Team International.

Don’t miss one of the Best Entrepreneur Events Helping Entrepreneurs & Small Business Owners everywhere achieve over the top outstanding results! And there is no cost (regular price $97 includes your FREE Gift) when you register with this link: www.success2020.com/mastermind2020

10 Ways to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking

Public Speaking

The most common phobia that people have is the “fear of public speaking”. Some people dread it more than death. Schools and colleges rarely provide training on public speaking; you’re just told to stand at the front and read your book report or story of what you did that summer. Being judged by your peers can make you either love or hate the attention you get from speaking to an audience.

Having confidence with public speaking will make you stand out from the crowd. You’ll be more likely to succeed at job interviews. You’ll be more comfortable contributing your point of view when working in a team. And you’ll be more likely to give winning presentations and seminars in the workplace. Altogether you’ll have a better professional life and relationships with your colleagues.

As a confident speaker you’ll be more comfortable breaking the ice and starting conversations with strangers. You’ll be a better networker with an expanded social circle and self-confidence in your personal life.

Plus you’ll be more likely to succeed in a career where teaching or training is required, whether you’re teaching to an individual or from stage to an audience of two thousand people.

With all these opportunities for succees, the key is about overcoming your fear of public speaking. The first tip? Remember that you’re not alone and that almost everyone has a fear of public speaking!

1. Have Powerful Physiology.

If you act “as if you’re the boss” often you get to be boss is an old principle in business. And now one of the most prestigious business schools in the world, Harvard, has proved the idea.

Organisational psychologist Professor Amy Cuddy has shown that when people change their postures into dominant poses their testosterone goes up and their cortisol goes down. Those changes are associated with leadership roles, and people do feel more powerful when they adopt the appropriate body language.

Walk on stage with confidence, with your shoulders back and arms powerful. Don’t allow yourself to be stiff; just be real and strong.

2. Breathe.

Healthy, deep breathing improves your ability to be effective whenever you are facing a particularly stressful situation. So it’s natural that you’d need it before delivering presentations, or when you’re about to deliver bad news, or when you need to ask for something important.

Deep breathing helps relieve nervous energy. It helps develop a strong voice and it helps to strengthen personal intensity. It is important for our energy, our focus, and our concentration.

Unfortunately, most of us breathe with our shoulders. We’re shallow “chest breathers” where our stomach goes in and shoulders go up. But if you fill your lungs with a deep inhale and follow it up with a slow exhale, it will relax and refresh you.

3. Come from service (it’s not about you).

Start out by taking the pressure off of you and your performance. No matter who you’re speaking to, your focus needs to be in one place only — on your audience. It’s not about you. It’s all about them.

Audience-centered speaking will help to move your audience to action. You need to listen to your audience from the moment you step in front of people. And when you ask ‘How are you?’ of an audience, wait to see how some members of that audience actually are. Don’t continue until you’ve learned the answer, either verbally or nonverbally.

Take a good look around the room, smile while you make some eye contact, take a few steps toward the group and let your hands fall open gracefully toward the audience — as though you wished you could give them a big hug. (or not, but hopefully you get the idea!)

4. Don’t take anything personally.

As long as your information is correct, nobody is going to hold anything against your if you make a mistake. Follow the examples of great comedians. Instead of letting mistakes interrupt the show, they incorporate them into the show. They laugh at themselves. This gets the audience to laugh with them instead of at them.

With a public presentation, you want the audience to laugh with you when something goes wrong instead of laughing at you. You can achieve this by not taking mistakes personally and having a sense of humor about them.

5. Stay present.

A public speaking event often involves a ton of distractions for the speaker. Unfortunately these distractions draw us away from what’s happening in the present moment. So it’s important that you anchor yourself: to yourself, to your audience, to your content, and to your context.

Focusing on your breath is one tactic you can use to feel centered within ourselves and your presentation. To stay present with your audience just remember that the audience is filled with people – with individual human beings just like you and me – and by connecting with them one at a time. And, finally, to stay present your message, remember what is it that you want to accomplish. Why have you been asked to speak in the first place? What do you feel passionately about that brings us to this presentation? What is the gift that you are sharing with your audience? What is your core message? When we focus on these questions rather than our fear, we are able to stay grounded in what’s truly important to us.

6. Say to your mindfrick, “Thank you for sharing”.

No matter what, there’s going to be a little voice in your head saying something to you. More likely than not that mindfrick is going to be chattering away telling you that you can’t do it. But remember that you’re stronger than you think.

When that little voice starts going on and attacking your confidence, just say to yourself “Thank you for sharing” and move on. Don’t respond. Don’t listen. Don’t dwell. Don’t work yourself up into a tizzy. Instead acknowledge that it’s just your mind trying to get the best of you, and move on.

7. Remember, you don’t look as nervous as you feel.

Remember what “fear” is. Fear is the anticipation of pain. Is your fear real or imagined? Chances are likely that it’s imagined. Your fear is not that you don’t know your topic. It is that you don’t know what will happen when you step to the podium.

When you’re walking out on stage, no one knows you’re nervous. Your stomach could be in knots and you may feel like you’re going to be sick, but you aren’t showing it. There are only a few subtle cues that show a person is nervous and they’re so small that the ordinary person wouldn’t be able to notice them from where they’re sitting. People don’t see that nervous beast inside you!

8. It gets easier.

Really and truly, it does get easier. Get practice and feedback in a safe environment by joining a public speaking group like mastermind2020 Toastmasters club. You’ll get the chance to learn from watching others. And you’ll be reminded that you’re not alone with your fear. Something that helps more than anything is practicing the outline of what you want to say. The more you know your content, the less nervous you’re likely to feel. Speaking groups are an excellent way to hone your presentation’s content and structure.

9. People want you to succeed.

Audiences want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you. So give them what they want and feel great in the process!

10. Trust yourself.

As long as you know where your content is starting, and where you want to go, trust that you’ll be able to take your audience from Point A to Point B. Know where you’re going by picking a few main points and bring them to life with stories. If you practice enough, you’ll soon come across smooth. And know that you CAN do it.

To your success,

Andres

The Brain of the Successful Businessman

Real entrepreneurs love their businesses, are good at what they do, and provide 90% of the employment in the world. They are the engine that drives capitalist societies.  This is something you may want to consider if you are an entrepreneur.

Men and Women who succeed in business of any kind – those producers who take personal responsibility for their income and not via a job – share a particular attitude and mindset that works. Those who don’t, simply fail. And while not all failures can be attributed to the fault of the entrepreneur – acts of God, and so on, it mostly is our fault.

The transition from employee to entrepreneur is difficult for most, while for the real entrepreneur it’s a wonderful liberation. Of course background and conditioning have an effect, but the most important factor is attitude. In the final analysis, the defining factor is mindset. Please note that when I talk about “entrepreneurs,” I’m not talking about franchisees – employees who buy an expensive job and continue to take orders and demand that the franchisor take ultimate responsibility for the franchisee’s success or failure.

I’m talking about lasting success, not a lucky break, a flash in the pan, being at the right place at the right time, or buying a business that is already so successful that it’s hard to fail; I refer to the self made person who builds lasting success and bounces back from failures.

So, what is the ideal mindset for progress and production in business?

Successful business owners, be they network marketers, Donald Trumps, shoe polishers, auto shops, roofing business owners, plumbers, or authors, are driven people. Their goals and objectives drive them through the tough times. And they tend to surround themselves with like minded people – winners, not whiners. They read, they are lifetime learners, and they are humble. Most of all, they are self disciplined. A successful entrepreneur is seldom obese, a smoker, a drinker, late for meetings, or badly dressed. And they are well groomed, because they have a healthy self respect. Donald Trump doesn’t drink, smoke, or use bad language. I certainly can’t imagine him smoking pot.

Authenticity, integrity and decency are hallmarks of these winners – they are not politically correct hypocrites or passive aggressive back stabbers; you know where you stand with them.

You learn more at www.MasterMind2020.com

Average vs Winners

Average people seek out people who are in more trouble and who are more desperate than they are. They need to surround themselves with losers so that they can feel good about themselves. They stand up for the underdog and the environment because that’s the only way they can feel important. They have “Ain’t it awful?” conversations and blame others for their own lack of success.
Winners seek out those who are more successful and positive than they are. They take responsibility for their own results and will not associate with losers and leeches. They feel they deserve what they earn.
 
Average people need instant results to keep them motivated. They have no staying power. They think business is like instant coffee and they hate the idea of work. They will only try new ventures for a few weeks before quitting and blaming the opportunity and shooting the messenger.
Winners understand compound growth and the slight edge. They are willing to put in the time and effort in order to see exponential growth down the line. They understand sowing and reaping and work with the natural laws of the universe.
 
Average people are mystics and believe in luck and chance. Along with their cigarettes and beer they buy lottery tickets. They gamble and wish.
Winners believe in responsibility and choice. They create their own success. They are objective, rational and careful where they invest their resources. I’ve never met a winner who gambles, or buys lottery tickets. And it’s rare to find winners who smoke.
 
Average people read newspapers, watch CNN, and spend hours watching sport. Their input is meaningless and negative. They live vicariously through soap operas and sports.
Winners carefully monitor their INPUT, participate in meaningful activities, and respect their own time as their greatest resource. They don’t not allow negative input in their lives.

 

“Are You Average

Are you Average ?

When offered opportunities to improve their lives, for average people, the threat always outweighs the opportunity. They focus on what can go wrong, make excuses, and allow their fear to put their faith in a wheelchair. Winners get excited about new opportunities, minimize their risk through Joint Ventures, and focus on what can go right. They are willing to do what others don’t, so they will have what others won’t. Their “WHY” always overshadows their “HOW”. They expect to win, so they do.

Average people say, “I work (selling my time) ” to earn money to buy food to give me energy to go back to work to earn money…”
Winners leverage other peoples’ time and money to increase their assets and net worth. They work smart, not hard. They use their brains, not their hands. They don’t sell their own time unless it leads directly to leverage opportunities.

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