Business Coaching, Business Growth, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Strength Training, Train the Trainers

10 Ways to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking

Public Speaking

The most common phobia that people have is the “fear of public speaking”. Some people dread it more than death. Schools and colleges rarely provide training on public speaking; you’re just told to stand at the front and read your book report or story of what you did that summer. Being judged by your peers can make you either love or hate the attention you get from speaking to an audience.

Having confidence with public speaking will make you stand out from the crowd. You’ll be more likely to succeed at job interviews. You’ll be more comfortable contributing your point of view when working in a team. And you’ll be more likely to give winning presentations and seminars in the workplace. Altogether you’ll have a better professional life and relationships with your colleagues.

As a confident speaker you’ll be more comfortable breaking the ice and starting conversations with strangers. You’ll be a better networker with an expanded social circle and self-confidence in your personal life.

Plus you’ll be more likely to succeed in a career where teaching or training is required, whether you’re teaching to an individual or from stage to an audience of two thousand people.

With all these opportunities for succees, the key is about overcoming your fear of public speaking. The first tip? Remember that you’re not alone and that almost everyone has a fear of public speaking!

1. Have Powerful Physiology.

If you act “as if you’re the boss” often you get to be boss is an old principle in business. And now one of the most prestigious business schools in the world, Harvard, has proved the idea.

Organisational psychologist Professor Amy Cuddy has shown that when people change their postures into dominant poses their testosterone goes up and their cortisol goes down. Those changes are associated with leadership roles, and people do feel more powerful when they adopt the appropriate body language.

Walk on stage with confidence, with your shoulders back and arms powerful. Don’t allow yourself to be stiff; just be real and strong.

2. Breathe.

Healthy, deep breathing improves your ability to be effective whenever you are facing a particularly stressful situation. So it’s natural that you’d need it before delivering presentations, or when you’re about to deliver bad news, or when you need to ask for something important.

Deep breathing helps relieve nervous energy. It helps develop a strong voice and it helps to strengthen personal intensity. It is important for our energy, our focus, and our concentration.

Unfortunately, most of us breathe with our shoulders. We’re shallow “chest breathers” where our stomach goes in and shoulders go up. But if you fill your lungs with a deep inhale and follow it up with a slow exhale, it will relax and refresh you.

3. Come from service (it’s not about you).

Start out by taking the pressure off of you and your performance. No matter who you’re speaking to, your focus needs to be in one place only — on your audience. It’s not about you. It’s all about them.

Audience-centered speaking will help to move your audience to action. You need to listen to your audience from the moment you step in front of people. And when you ask ‘How are you?’ of an audience, wait to see how some members of that audience actually are. Don’t continue until you’ve learned the answer, either verbally or nonverbally.

Take a good look around the room, smile while you make some eye contact, take a few steps toward the group and let your hands fall open gracefully toward the audience — as though you wished you could give them a big hug. (or not, but hopefully you get the idea!)

4. Don’t take anything personally.

As long as your information is correct, nobody is going to hold anything against your if you make a mistake. Follow the examples of great comedians. Instead of letting mistakes interrupt the show, they incorporate them into the show. They laugh at themselves. This gets the audience to laugh with them instead of at them.

With a public presentation, you want the audience to laugh with you when something goes wrong instead of laughing at you. You can achieve this by not taking mistakes personally and having a sense of humor about them.

5. Stay present.

A public speaking event often involves a ton of distractions for the speaker. Unfortunately these distractions draw us away from what’s happening in the present moment. So it’s important that you anchor yourself: to yourself, to your audience, to your content, and to your context.

Focusing on your breath is one tactic you can use to feel centered within ourselves and your presentation. To stay present with your audience just remember that the audience is filled with people – with individual human beings just like you and me – and by connecting with them one at a time. And, finally, to stay present your message, remember what is it that you want to accomplish. Why have you been asked to speak in the first place? What do you feel passionately about that brings us to this presentation? What is the gift that you are sharing with your audience? What is your core message? When we focus on these questions rather than our fear, we are able to stay grounded in what’s truly important to us.

6. Say to your mindfrick, “Thank you for sharing”.

No matter what, there’s going to be a little voice in your head saying something to you. More likely than not that mindfrick is going to be chattering away telling you that you can’t do it. But remember that you’re stronger than you think.

When that little voice starts going on and attacking your confidence, just say to yourself “Thank you for sharing” and move on. Don’t respond. Don’t listen. Don’t dwell. Don’t work yourself up into a tizzy. Instead acknowledge that it’s just your mind trying to get the best of you, and move on.

7. Remember, you don’t look as nervous as you feel.

Remember what “fear” is. Fear is the anticipation of pain. Is your fear real or imagined? Chances are likely that it’s imagined. Your fear is not that you don’t know your topic. It is that you don’t know what will happen when you step to the podium.

When you’re walking out on stage, no one knows you’re nervous. Your stomach could be in knots and you may feel like you’re going to be sick, but you aren’t showing it. There are only a few subtle cues that show a person is nervous and they’re so small that the ordinary person wouldn’t be able to notice them from where they’re sitting. People don’t see that nervous beast inside you!

8. It gets easier.

Really and truly, it does get easier. Get practice and feedback in a safe environment by joining a public speaking group like mastermind2020 Toastmasters club. You’ll get the chance to learn from watching others. And you’ll be reminded that you’re not alone with your fear. Something that helps more than anything is practicing the outline of what you want to say. The more you know your content, the less nervous you’re likely to feel. Speaking groups are an excellent way to hone your presentation’s content and structure.

9. People want you to succeed.

Audiences want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative and entertaining. They’re rooting for you. So give them what they want and feel great in the process!

10. Trust yourself.

As long as you know where your content is starting, and where you want to go, trust that you’ll be able to take your audience from Point A to Point B. Know where you’re going by picking a few main points and bring them to life with stories. If you practice enough, you’ll soon come across smooth. And know that you CAN do it.

To your success,

Andres

Standard
Business Development, Business Growth, Entrepreneurship, Startups, Strategic Planning

How to Launch a Business in the Sharing Economy?

As a tech CEO who often traveled on pleasure and business I’ve been Intrigued by the growing popularity of peer-to-peer platforms like Airbnb and Uber, After seeing how Them can turn any house into a hotel and any car into a cab, many entrepreneurs have been hoping to discover the next peer-to-peer market—one they can leverage to enable members to monetize not just their possessions, but also their resources, talents and passions,

Beth Buczynski, author of Sharing Is Good. How to Save Money, Time and Resources Through Collaborative Consumption, credits the growing popularity of sharing-economy startups to a consumer base that’s fed up with corporate domination and has shifted its values toward more mindful choices.

“We’re choosing to support people-minded companies and products that provide real value, prioritize efficiency, slash waste and cultivate solutions.”

“We’re finding this in peer-to-peer models that cut out the middle man and allow us direct access to each other and the goods or services we need.”

Two essential elements of successful peer-to-peer ventures are community and density. “[These businesses don’t] work without people who care, are committed to the behavior and trust each other,” “And sharing is easiest when the space between us is smallest. That’s why cities like San Francisco and New York have become hotbeds of peer-to-peer sharing.”

Think you know what will be the Airbnb of fill-in-the-blank? Relying on independent contractors to deliver the experience and service you need to succeed takes careful planning and execution—much of it different from that of traditional businesses. Whether it’s dog-sitting or car rental or handyman services, the launch of a successful peer-to-peer platform depends on sharp screening, extensive training and streamlined delivery.

“Take the time to look for real problems that need real solutions—problems that can be best solved by communities themselves,”. “Then provide the infrastructure so they can.”

Here are some factors to consider.

1. Start with supply.
While many entrepreneurs assume that identifying (or creating) robust demand is the first requirement of a viable peer-to-peer launch, it’s equally important to cultivate a ready stable of suppliers.

“You need to get the supply infrastructure in place before you can push the demand side, and make sure the market is in equilibrium,”. A company targets prospective suppliers known as “Taskers” through Facebook and Google advertising focused on the company’s core demographic and ZIP codes.

The same principle applies to scaling. Before TaskRabbit considers expanding into a new city, it ensures that the necessary suppliers are there.

“We typically have hundreds of interested Taskers who have signed up for the service prior to launching in a city, and we make sure in every ZIP code the supply and demand are at an equilibrium,” noting that since TaskRabbit captures email addresses and ZIP codes from interested and potential participants, it’s a fairly easy process.

FlightCar seeks public relations and press opportunities, as well as word-of-mouth through referral programs.
Since launching in 2013 in Boston and raising a total of $20 million in venture capital.

Building the peer-to-peer component is all about understanding different ways to market to people so you can feed the marketplace on both sides.
FlightCar seeks public relations and press opportunities, as well as word-of-mouth through referral programs.

Building the peer-to-peer component is all about understanding different ways to market to people so you can feed the marketplace on both sides

2. Conduct extensive screening and training.
As inclusive and socially positive as the sharing-economy ideology may seem, not everyone who applies will be a good fit for your business. Even though they’re not your employees, your providers are the face of your business, so it’s crucial to train them accordingly.

Once recruited, prospective candidates complete an online application with both written and video components, which are then screened and, if approved, forwarded to company headquarters. There, the candidates are reviewed again and, upon approval, receive a confirmation email asking them to log in and build their profile. After that, they must view 12 online training videos and take tests on what they’ve learned.

“They’re on the front line, so it’s all about integrating your culture and what you expect”

3. Foster trust.

Positive online reviews and ratings are also crucial for gaining consumer trust and generating leads. Indeed, transparency is everything in the peer-to-peer world.

4. Keep payments simple.
It’s all about automation, so you’re going to want to streamline it as much as possible.

do not accept cash. “If we were to take cash, how would we handle that cash, and how would we get it back to the company? All of that paperwork can be mitigated through technology today.”

The entire process is paperless and automated. Use deposit on money debit card.

5. Focus on brand-building.

By nature, a successful peer-to-peer service has a built-in community of people who are engaging with and talking about it. Smart entrepreneurs will harness this momentum to develop a more robust brand, enhanced by the availability of compelling content.

create the best high-quality content that’s motivating and makes people feel inspired,”

To your success

Andres Hurtado Rangel

www.mastermind2020.com

/home/wpcom/public_html/wp-content/blogs.dir/faf/68267906/files/2014/12/img_7120.jpg

Standard
Business Coaching, Entrepreneurship, sales, Startups

“Whatever it takes” means 24/7/365 availability

I’m addicted to freedom and congruence – and I do whatever it takes to create freedom, whether that’s making money, getting fit, building solid relationships… I do whatever it takes, and I never compromise

“Whatever it takes” means 24/7/365 availability. ordinary people will tell you that you need “balance” – “Don’t work too hard”, “Take it easy”. But if I love my business, why is doing business bad but playing golf all day is good? I work very smart.
Only losers can’t understand that your business can be (and should be) your passion, hobby, mission and purpose.
Success is not only about money, we know that – and words like “addiction” and “fanaticism” are used here in the context of commitment. How do you know whether you’re addicted to success or not? See what you do and think about and talk about and you will know your addiction.

Addiction to success in every area of your life means commitment without compromise, retreat, excuses, or waste. Someone who is addicted to success is like that drug addict – complete focus, no distraction, total commitment. They take responsibility for achieving their goals. Winners are like Jeff Olson, self-made multi-millionaire, a success in every area of his life. He was playing baseball in a successful team and made a decision to quit the baseball in favor of his business. Being an expert in baseball, unless you’re a professional, does not put money in the bank.

to your success,

Standard
Business Coaching, Business Intelligence, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Marketing, Mastermind2020, sales, Strength Training, Train the Trainers

The Brain of the Successful Businessman

Real entrepreneurs love their businesses, are good at what they do, and provide 90% of the employment in the world. They are the engine that drives capitalist societies.  This is something you may want to consider if you are an entrepreneur.

Men and Women who succeed in business of any kind – those producers who take personal responsibility for their income and not via a job – share a particular attitude and mindset that works. Those who don’t, simply fail. And while not all failures can be attributed to the fault of the entrepreneur – acts of God, and so on, it mostly is our fault.

The transition from employee to entrepreneur is difficult for most, while for the real entrepreneur it’s a wonderful liberation. Of course background and conditioning have an effect, but the most important factor is attitude. In the final analysis, the defining factor is mindset. Please note that when I talk about “entrepreneurs,” I’m not talking about franchisees – employees who buy an expensive job and continue to take orders and demand that the franchisor take ultimate responsibility for the franchisee’s success or failure.

I’m talking about lasting success, not a lucky break, a flash in the pan, being at the right place at the right time, or buying a business that is already so successful that it’s hard to fail; I refer to the self made person who builds lasting success and bounces back from failures.

So, what is the ideal mindset for progress and production in business?

Successful business owners, be they network marketers, Donald Trumps, shoe polishers, auto shops, roofing business owners, plumbers, or authors, are driven people. Their goals and objectives drive them through the tough times. And they tend to surround themselves with like minded people – winners, not whiners. They read, they are lifetime learners, and they are humble. Most of all, they are self disciplined. A successful entrepreneur is seldom obese, a smoker, a drinker, late for meetings, or badly dressed. And they are well groomed, because they have a healthy self respect. Donald Trump doesn’t drink, smoke, or use bad language. I certainly can’t imagine him smoking pot.

Authenticity, integrity and decency are hallmarks of these winners – they are not politically correct hypocrites or passive aggressive back stabbers; you know where you stand with them.

You learn more at www.MasterMind2020.com

Standard
Business Coaching, Business Growth, Business Incubation, Entrepreneurship, Mastermind2020, Strength Training, Team Building

Being a great accountability partner

The Process for being a great Accountability Partner

  • Some qualities of a good accountability partner are: they have an important goal too, they are trustworthy to show up each time, they care about your success, they want accountability also
  • Each person explains exactly what they want to be held accountable for
  • It’s not a casual conversation, it’s a strategic meeting
  • Set a specific length of time for the meeting
  • Set a recurring day, recurring time, for the weekly calls
  • Set an agenda that you will follow each time
  • Set a specific number of meetings you’ll have in the series. Then decide to go for another period of time or change partners
  • Put into writing how both parties will benefit by being an accountability partner
  • Be sure they know your vision and the cost to you of failure to follow through
  • Do your personalities match, will this be a good fit?

To your Success,

Andres Hurtado Rangel
http://www.mastermind2020.com

Standard
Business Coaching, Business Growth, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Strength Training

Average vs Winners

Average people seek out people who are in more trouble and who are more desperate than they are. They need to surround themselves with losers so that they can feel good about themselves. They stand up for the underdog and the environment because that’s the only way they can feel important. They have “Ain’t it awful?” conversations and blame others for their own lack of success.
Winners seek out those who are more successful and positive than they are. They take responsibility for their own results and will not associate with losers and leeches. They feel they deserve what they earn.
 
Average people need instant results to keep them motivated. They have no staying power. They think business is like instant coffee and they hate the idea of work. They will only try new ventures for a few weeks before quitting and blaming the opportunity and shooting the messenger.
Winners understand compound growth and the slight edge. They are willing to put in the time and effort in order to see exponential growth down the line. They understand sowing and reaping and work with the natural laws of the universe.
 
Average people are mystics and believe in luck and chance. Along with their cigarettes and beer they buy lottery tickets. They gamble and wish.
Winners believe in responsibility and choice. They create their own success. They are objective, rational and careful where they invest their resources. I’ve never met a winner who gambles, or buys lottery tickets. And it’s rare to find winners who smoke.
 
Average people read newspapers, watch CNN, and spend hours watching sport. Their input is meaningless and negative. They live vicariously through soap operas and sports.
Winners carefully monitor their INPUT, participate in meaningful activities, and respect their own time as their greatest resource. They don’t not allow negative input in their lives.

 

Standard
Business Coaching, Entrepreneurship, Leadership

Are you Average ?

When offered opportunities to improve their lives, for average people, the threat always outweighs the opportunity. They focus on what can go wrong, make excuses, and allow their fear to put their faith in a wheelchair. Winners get excited about new opportunities, minimize their risk through Joint Ventures, and focus on what can go right. They are willing to do what others don’t, so they will have what others won’t. Their “WHY” always overshadows their “HOW”. They expect to win, so they do.

Average people say, “I work (selling my time) ” to earn money to buy food to give me energy to go back to work to earn money…”
Winners leverage other peoples’ time and money to increase their assets and net worth. They work smart, not hard. They use their brains, not their hands. They don’t sell their own time unless it leads directly to leverage opportunities.

“Are You Average

Quote
%d bloggers like this: